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We Are Going to Write An Entire Sales Page Together Over the Next Few Weeks


Neville

sales-page-writing-together-chalkboard

One of the most intimidating things to create for a copywriter to write is a sales page.

They're big...

They're long...

They're intimidating...

...kind of like my p.....nevermind ;)

ANYHOW, sales pages usually have lots of sections that need to be written, have images created for, laid out properly, and tested. However it's worth it, as a good sales page can often make-or-break a product.

I personally think sales pages are relatively simple when broken down step-by-step, so we're going to try a little experiment....

We're going to write a full sales page together!

holding hands

Just me & you!

 

Tomorrow, we will start the first step of writing a sales page:

The Planning Phase.

 

Stay tuned, and seeya then!

Sincerely,

Neville Medhora - Sales Page Writer

P.S. What questions do you currently have about writing sales pages? Ask them below:


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Guest Neville Medhora

Posted

This will be the very first thing we cover! Thanks for asking Rina :)
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Can you demonstrate how you begin the process? There seem to be so many sections in a sales page. Do you write them in order?
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Guest Jan Rutger

Posted

Hi Neville, this comes at the right moment! Last night I was awake thinking about setting up a sales page for one of our products.

Do you also tell us more about setting up a email automation / funnel behind the sales page?

Waiting for your input...

Regards from The Netherlands!

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Hi Neville

where do you go to first when you are doing the market research ?

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Guest Rohi Shetty

Posted

Thanks a ton, Neville!

Looking forward to this. What groundwork/research do you do before starting work on the sales page itself?

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Guest Dejan

Posted

Would love to see the whole thought process:

Is it research first, outline second?

Do you write the ending first?

How many times do you edit?

Do you do your own proofreading?

How do you know the copy will work - do you test it out on a small segment first?

Do you have some sort of KPIs to see if the copy performs good enough against those KPI?

Looking forward to those answers!

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Great topic!

Few things that stump me....

1) How do you decide on an angle or lead type to go with?

2) Do you use any conventional formulas like AIDA?

3) Your process - outline, research, draft etc.

4) What do you write in? Recently heard about scrivener... Which comes highly recommended.

5) I've heard many pros say the 'Big Idea' is more important than the copy itself. What's your take?

Thanks man!

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Guest Gerard

Posted

To what extent do you work on using the customer's language?

I've heard people like Ramit Sethi and the folks at Fizzle discuss the importance of customer conversations. From these conversations, copywriters can learn the exact, emotionally-charged language that the customers are using to discuss their hopes, dreams, fears, wants, needs, etc.

-Do you do these types of conversations when writing for clients?

-What good questions do you ask customers to elicit great answers?

-Are there particular instances where you would spend more time on customer surveys/research, and sometimes just go straight to the copy? It seems like you have a quick writing, get it done style, yet you still produce professional, high quality copy. How do you balance the two?

Missing those office hours! : (((

Gerard

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Guest Carolyn Richardson

Posted

How important is defining the Objective or what you want them to do? Example: call the number to purchase, get free quote, go to website.

Thanks Neville!

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Guest Tommy

Posted

OOOOH Boy! This is going to be fun. Will you be showing how break the three second attention barrier as well?
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Guest Nadine

Posted

Hi Neville,

As a freelance copywriter, I am wondering how you go about getting the brief from your client. How do you determine that a certain tone will be better? Also, is there necessary information the client must provide for you to get started?

Thanks.

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Hi Neville, I hear there are short- and long-page sales pages. Are there any general rules (or guides) on which to use at what times or for what products? Thanks. Love your emails – keep 'em coming!
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Guest Yair Katz

Posted

I'm already eager to start.

my main concern is how can i come up with a system that will determine if any kind of a sales page is working well or not?

i know it depends on a lot of factors, but having some kind of general "rule of thumbs" element would be really great.

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Do you create the stick figure illustrations yourself?
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Guest Kate Johnson

Posted

Why can't they be short and sweet? I always feel like I have to search for a price, when for me, that is one of the filters that allows me to make a decision. It is always sad when I get to the pricing, waaaaaaaayyyyyyyyy down a page filled with all sorts of enticements only to find that no options fit my financial situation.

Thanks!

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Not to knock the importance of the Copywriting (Kopywriting?) greats, but how much has the approach to direct response changed because of tech?

When people can research your product/reviews, what else do you need in place in addition to a solid sales page (besides a quality product)?

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Guest Kelly

Posted

When you start from scratch on a sales page (first-timer here) what do you estimate the time needed to get it online and working?
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Guest augusto

Posted

My questions is about the structure for differents copys and persuasive words.
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Hey Neville!

How do you write a sales page that doesn't seem like a sales page to the person reading it?

Not to be sneaking, but to make a sales page that people enjoy!

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Hi Neville,

Will you be covering VSL as well?

Thanks and cheers

Bina

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Guest John W.

Posted

I'm pumped for this.

How do you tell when a sales page has "enough?" I've gotten feedback from customers and prospects that they "don't like" or "don't have time" to read. Obviously sprinkling in some images helps, but if you have a somewhat convoluted product that takes some explaining, where do you strike a balance between your customer's time and making a strong and complete enough pitch to convert them?

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Guest Happy Lurker

Posted

How much of customer research goes into writing sales pages for you? For ex, do you take phrases word-for-word of how your customers describe their pain, what your product did for them, etc.?

What % of sales writing is art and how much is science? Is it all formulas, does cleverness play into it, etc.

How complex do drip sequences really need to before the law of diminishing returns makes it not worth getting any deeper? I've always been intimidated at just how deep some bloggers go.

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